How Trump could cause a 21st Century witch hunt

eats shoots 'n leaves

Way back when esnl was an undergrad majoring in anthropology, one of our professors relentlessly hammered in one point: People are territorial group animals just like chimpanzees, our closest primate cousins [the bonobo hadn’t be recognized yet as a separate species even closer to us than chimps].

We also know that violence breaks out among chimps when resources are scarce and groups come into conflict.

We’ve also learned that humans who see themselves and their groups under threat can respond in those same primal ways.

And history teaches us that demagogues with dark agendas can exploit those same instincts to enhance their own positions of power by targeting popular anger towards the weak and those readily distinguishable from our own groups.

Some of our first television memories, after we got one of the first sets in town when we were six years old, was of the Army/McCarthy hearings, when a…

View original post 984 more words

Billionaires richer than ever

Dear Kitty. Some blog

The world's top billionaires

By Shannon Jones:

Wealth of world’s billionaires soars amid stock market surge

22 March 2017

The ranks of the world’s billionaires registered a sharp increase in 2016, with the number rising by 233 to reach a record 2,043, according to Forbes magazine’s annual survey. This was the first time that the Forbes list of the world’s richest has included more than 2,000 individuals.

The combined wealth of those on Forbes’ billionaires list rose 18 percent to $7.67 trillion, a staggering sum, more than the gross domestic product of all but the wealthiest of the world’s countries. The immediate impetus for the rise are surging stock prices, which have reached record levels since the election of US president Donald Trump, and the rising price of oil over the past 12 months.

More fundamentally, the increasing concentration of wealth among the world’s richest represents a social retrogression in which…

View original post 1,049 more words

Corrupt Elites Will Fight Hard to Stop the Dismantling of the Looting Machines from Which They Draw Their Vast Wealth

Stop Making Sense

Patrick Cockburn writes for The Independent:

Can corruption be controlled by reform or is it so much the essential fuel sustaining political elites that it will only be ended – if it ends at all – by revolutionary change?

The answer varies according to which countries one is talking about, but in many – particularly those relying on the sale of natural resources like oil or minerals – it is surely too late to expect any incremental change for the better. Anti-corruption drives are a show to impress the outside world or to target political rivals.

The [recent] anti-corruption summit in London may improve transparency and disclosure, but it can scarcely be very effective against politically well-connected racketeers, busily transmuting political power into great personal wealth.

This is peculiarly easy to do in those countries in the Middle East and Africa which suffer from what economists call “the resource curse”…

View original post 101 more words

Top 37 Regrets People Have As They Grow Older (Pay Attention To #15)

WebInvestigator.KK.org

When people look back and reflect on their lives, what are some of the most common regrets reported as they grow older?

by Sean Adl-Tabatabai

When people look back and reflect on their lives, what are some of the most common regrets reported as they grow older?

1. Not traveling when you had the chance.

Traveling becomes infinitely harder the older you get, especially if you have a family and need to pay the way for three-plus people instead of just yourself.

2. Not learning another language.

You’ll kick yourself when you realize you took three years of language in high school and remember none of it.

3. Staying in a bad relationship.

No one who ever gets out of a bad relationship looks back without wishing they made the move sooner.

4. Forgoing sunscreen.

Wrinkles, moles, and skin cancer can largely be avoided if you protect yourself. You can use Coconut oil!

5. Missing the chance to see your favorite musicians.

“Nah, dude, I’ll catch Nirvana next time they come through…

View original post 911 more words

Confessions of a Gay Male Madam in Wash. DC: The Politics of Sex, Lies, and Blackmail

Vegasmadam's Weblog

http://blog.confessionsofadcmadam.com/
By Henry Vinson, with Nick Bryant. An insider’s look into a nefarious governmental smear schemes.

Radio interview:  Opperman Report : Nick Bryant , Confessions of A DC Male Madam, Franklin Scandal    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iso6hcoY1DA  start @ 3:30

View original post

America’s TV Media Crisis Goes Far Beyond Covering Trump: We Simply Aren’t Hearing About the Most Pressing Issues of Our Time

Tales from the Conspiratum

“The remnants of American democracy are under daily assault from voter suppression and purges, billionaire-owned judges and politicians, billionaire-friendly tax and trade policies, and a billionaire-owned media.  Income and wealth inequality are at levels not seen since 1929, but you won’t hear a peep about it on the network news.”

Source: America’s TV Media Crisis Goes Far Beyond Covering Trump: We Simply Aren’t Hearing About the Most Pressing Issues of Our Time | Alternet

AlterNet

If the media really wants to fight Trump, they can start by reporting on climate change and inequality.
 

 

America has a “lying press” problem.  And it’s not the “enemy of the people” situation our president has asserted.

Consider the biggest threats America faces right now.  

Abrupt climate change is happening around the world as a result of our use of fossil fuels. France 24 reported

View original post 1,494 more words

Gang of Thieves: DEA Stole $3.2 Billion in Cash From Innocent People in Only a Decade

Tales from the Conspiratum

Source: Gang of Thieves: DEA Stole $3.2 Billion in Cash From Innocent People in Only a Decade

blacklistednews.com

Source: Justin Gardner

March 30, 2017

 A bombshell report from the Inspector General (IG) at the Department of Justice has exposed the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for the colossal thieves they are. According to the report, DEA seized more than $4 billion in cash from people since 2007, but $3.2 billion of the seizures were never connected to any criminal charges. That figure does not even include the seizure of cars and electronics.

View original post 772 more words

Muslims Confiscate Wives Salaries – Where Are Feminists?

WebInvestigator.KK.org

More Algerian women work, but husbands control wages

By AFP
Female police cadets perform during their graduation ceremony at the police academy in Ain Benian August 6, 2009. 
PHOTO: REUTERS

Female police cadets perform during their graduation ceremony at the police academy in Ain Benian August 6, 2009. PHOTO: REUTERS

ALGIERS: 

More and more Algerian women are challenging traditional norms by getting jobs, but many see their salaries confiscated by their husbands despite a law against the practice.

“It’s financial harassment,” lawyer Fatma-Zohra Benbraham said. “It’s a dangerous phenomenon that has been kept silent for a long time.”

Lawyers say that as more women go into the workplace, tensions over money are causing a surge in divorces.

lleviating poverty: 252 deserving women get buffaloes

Female employment rose from 10.2% in 2005 to 13.6 by 2015, with around 2 million Algerian women now in work, alongside just under nine million men. The number of divorces almost doubled from 34,000 in 2007 to around 60,000 in 2014.

View original post 400 more words

What do slaveholders think?

WebInvestigator.KK.org

Resultado de imagem para Labourers in Vidharbha region in Maharashtra, India. Photo by Sanjit Das/Panos

Labourers in Vidharbha region in Maharashtra, India. Photo by Sanjit Das/Panos

 image edited by Web Investigator

It is everywhere illegal yet slavery persists in many corners of the global economy. How do its beneficiaries justify it?

by Austin Choi-Fitzpatrick is a professor of sociology at the University of San Diego. His latest book is What Slaveholders Think (2017).

I liked Aanan as soon as I met him. My field notes read: ‘What a nice guy, you can just see from his face.’ Open-faced and conversational, he was enthusiastic about the explosive growth in his quarry operations and excited to show me around. Together, we toured the open mines where his workers carve into the earth, producing boulders that are broken down into gravel by smaller labourers, often women and children. Together with his workers, Aanan laughed at my efforts to repeat the process for myself, the sledge held high over…

View original post 713 more words